Sitting with the Turnarounds

 

Thank you, Byron Katie. These turnarounds are so helpful. I can feel how they resonate within me. What I also found interesting is how you reflect on the original statement right before you do the turnarounds. I can see how this sort of naturally comes up in the process. Is this like an extra thing to do to close of the process of the questions and move on to the turnarounds? Like the extra questions we sometimes ask?

Carmen

 

Thank you for asking, Carmen. I love that you see how naturally the statement arises (remains) before the turnarounds. So, no, it’s not really an extra thing that I do; it’s what I am shown as the statements meet each of the four questions one by one. And then turnarounds are shown to us, automatically, in the silence. And yes, throughout inquiry I’m always reflecting on the original statement, the specific situation, statement #1, on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. I anchor the statement, and, one statement at a time, I question the statement and witness; I experience the answers revealing themselves to me. I really want to know the truth and am actually inviting the unknown to show me, like a prayer. I am able to witness and listen closely, and I often feel that the answers, no matter what they may be, give me what I have longed for. It may occasionally feel like the death of what was, as I see from these new eyes. Also, if I’m not asking anything authentically, nothing happens but ego, of course. So the question is “Am I really asking? Am I being authentic in my asking? Do I really want to know the truth, or do I want to stick with what I think I already know and continue to get what it gives?” I really do want to know, and in that fearlessness and out of that silent listening, each question is answered. It’s the same for each turnaround and what that turnaround means to me within the specific situation I am focused on.

I do hope these words help to support your process, dearest.
bk


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